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Boris Johnson has been accused of pandering to the hard-right, as he convened his cabinet and faced MPs in the Commons for the first time as prime minister.

After a brutal reshuffle – clearing out the vast majority of Theresa May‘s ministers – it became clear the new prime minister had built his new government around the team that delivered the Brexit result in 2016.

Some of the ministerial appointments in Mr Johnson’s new administration were met with dismay, including the promotion of Priti Patel to the Home Office.

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The prime minister also used the reshuffle at minister of state level to promote allies and clear out MPs who oppose his stance on Brexit.

The first changes announced included Nigel Adams, who returns to government after resigning over Ms May's Brexit tactics.

He has been a loyal supporter of Mr Johnson and was rewarded with a role at the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Lucy Frazer moves from solicitor general to the Ministry of Justice.

Kit Malthouse, who was Mr Johnson's deputy mayor for policing during their time in London's City Hall, has become a Home Office minister.

Conor Burns has been appointed a minister at the Department for International Trade.

Nick Gibb retains his role at the Department for Education and Jesse Norman stays as financial secretary to the Treasury.

Follow how the day in Westminster unfolded:

Michel Barnier, the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, has written to EU member states, claiming Boris Johnson's comments on the backstop are "unacceptable". 
 
He added: "As suggested by his rather combative speech, we have to be ready for a situation where he gives priority to the planning for 'no deal', partly to heap pressure on the unity of the EU27."
 
"PM Johnson has stated that if an agreement is to be reached it goes by way of eliminating the backstop. This is of course unacceptable and not within the mandate of the European Council," he wrote.
 
More here from our Europe Correspondent Jon Stone
 
In a sign that there is no trust in any stability in British politics, and the growing speculation of a snap general election, Mr Barnier added his message: "I note also the many strong reactions to the speech in the House of Commons. In this context we must follow carefully the further political and economic reactions and developments in the UK following the speech."

Boris Johnson has ripped up Theresa May’s plans for immigration after Brexit – including her infamous pledge to slash annual numbers to “tens of thousands” – and ordered officials to explore more liberal rules.

In his first Commons statement, the new prime minister said advisers would be work up plans for “an Australian-style points based system”, declining to set any limit on migrants.

He also repeated his support for an amnesty for existing migrants without documents, acknowledging it could see “perhaps half a million people” gaining the right to remain in the UK.

 
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Political commentator Andrew Grice has written his latest column on Boris Johnson's brutal cull of cabinet ministers, and what could happen next. "The UK hasn’t held a winter general election since February 1974," he writes.
 
"There were two elections that year, as Labour’s Harold Wilson succeeded Edward Heath’s Conservatives, but the second on October 10 was before the clocks went back. Since then, elections have been held either in April, May or June."
 
 
A leading US television news host has delivered a brutal assessment of the new prime minister Boris Johnson, saying Britain now faces a “level of chaos … not seen since World War II.”

Lawrence O’Donnell, host of the MSNBC network’s The Last Word, could barely contain his astonishment at the “crazy” process that allowed the Tory MP to take power after “just over one-tenth of one per cent of the British population” voted in the leadership contest.

 

The Queen's first Privy Council meeting with Mr Johnson has been held at Buckingham Palace.
 
Mr Johnson took the oath of office as First Lord of the Treasury, and new Cabinet ministers received their seals of office from the Queen.
 
Among them were Sajid Javid, the new chancellor, Priti Patel, the new home secretary, and Dominic Raab, foreign secretary.
 
New members of the council sworn in included Jacob Rees-Mogg, who became Lord President of the Council as he is now Leader of
the Commons.
 
The Privy Council agrees items of government business that are not covered by departmental ministers. 
 
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Mr Johnson and Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission chief, have exchanged mobile phone numbers and agreed to keep in touch, the commission says.

A spokeswoman said the pair spoke on the phone this afternoon. "President Juncker congratulated Prime Minister Johnson on his appointment, and reaffirmed his commitment to working together in the best possible way.

"President Juncker listened to what prime minister Johnson had to say, reiterating the EU's position that the Withdrawal Agreement is the best and only agreement possible - in line with the European Council guidelines.

"President Juncker also underlined that the commission remains at the disposal of the United Kingdom to add language to the political declaration in line with what the 27 EU leaders recalled when they met in April earlier this year, and to analyse any ideas put forward by the United Kingdom, providing they are compatible with the Withdrawal Agreement."

 

Two more of Mr Johnson's appointments have been revealed. 

Nigel Adams becomes a minister at the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and Lucy Frazer goes to the Ministry of Justice.

Jesse Norman remains financial secretary to the Treasury.

Mr Johnson stressed to Mr Juncker that the "abolition of the backstop" was required if a deal was to be reached, Downing Street said.

A Number 10 spokesman said: "The prime minister today received a call of congratulation from European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker. The PM thanked the President for his message.
 
"On Brexit, the PM reiterated that he wants a deal, and will be energetic in pursuit of finding a way forward, but said the Withdrawal Agreement has been rejected three times by the UK Parliament and will not pass in its current form.
 
"The PM said that if an agreement is to be reached it must be understood that the way to a deal goes by way of the abolition of the backstop. The PM and the president agreed to stay in contact."
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In the latest announcements from Downing Street, Kit Malthouse has been appointed minister of state at the Home Department.

Conor Burns becomes minister of state at the Department for International Trade.
 
Nick Gibb remains a minister of state at the Department for Education.
George Eustice returns as minister of state at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs - he resigned from Defra in protest at Theresa May allowing a vote on delaying Brexit.

Therese Coffey gets a promotion from a junior minister at Defra to full minister of state rank.
Health minister Stephen Hammond, an opponent of a no-deal Brexit, has indicated is leaving the government.

As Mr Johnson began appointing ministers of state, Mr Hammond thanked officials and NHS staff, saying: "It has been a privilege to serve as minister for health.
 
"I'm proud to have contributed to the NHS long term plan."
 
He added: "I will support any government efforts to secure a good deal with the EU, and I remain absolutely opposed to no deal."
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Senior Brexiteer Steve Baker has said he had turned down a ministerial job.

The former junior Brexit minister said he could not "repeat my experience of powerlessness" he had felt.
 
But he added that he had "total confidence" in Mr Johnson to leave the EU by 31 October, warning "disaster awaits otherwise".
Christopher Pincher has been appointed minister of state at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Mark Lancaster remains a minister of state at the Ministry of Defence.

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