Princess Eugenie wore a 99-year-old tiara for her wedding to Jack Brooksbank.

For her wedding to Jack Brooksbank, the 28-year-old royal paired her Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos gown with the Greville Emerald Kokosnik Tiara, which was lent to her by The Queen.

The iconic piece of jewellery was made by the French jeweller Boucheron in 1919 for British socialite and philanthropist Margaret Greville.

Princess Eugenie of York waves as she arrives for her wedding to Jack Brooksbank at St George's Chapel (AFP/Getty Images)

Its design mimics the traditional "kokoshnik" style, a headdress worn by women in the northern regions of Russia and made popular in the Russian Imperial Court, according to a statement released by Buckingham Palace.

It is made of rose cut diamonds pavé set in platinum and features six emeralds on either side of the central 93.70-carat emerald.

(EPA)

The tiara was part of a collection of jewellery left by Greville to the Queen Mother titled the "Greville bequest".

The Queen inherited the tiara as her own following the death of her mother in 2002.

Speaking to The Independent, Hamish Shephard, founder of wedding planner site Bridebook.co.uk explains why Eugenie's tiara was the perfect addition to her wedding day look.

"The formality of the tiara is offset by the open shoulders of the dress, creating a beautiful balance between the two.

"The green jewels are especially striking, given that it's a trend the wedding industry hasn't seen for some time.

"The way the green complements the Princess's eyes and hair is sure to set the trend of incorporating more coloured jewels in your wedding outfit."

(Getty Images)

The tiara was not the only piece of Eugenie's wedding jewellery which had ties to The Queen: her wedding ring was also made from a piece of Welsh gold given by HRH.

 

Comments

Share your thoughts and debate the big issues

Learn more
Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines.
  • You may not agree with our views, or other users’, but please respond to them respectfully
  • Swearing, personal abuse, racism, sexism, homophobia and other discriminatory or inciteful language is not acceptable
  • Do not impersonate other users or reveal private information about third parties
  • We reserve the right to delete inappropriate posts and ban offending users without notification

You can find our Community Guidelines in full here.

Create a commenting name to join the debate

Please try again, the name must be unique Only letters and numbers accepted
Loading comments...
Loading comments...
Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines.
  • You may not agree with our views, or other users’, but please respond to them respectfully
  • Swearing, personal abuse, racism, sexism, homophobia and other discriminatory or inciteful language is not acceptable
  • Do not impersonate other users or reveal private information about third parties
  • We reserve the right to delete inappropriate posts and ban offending users without notification

You can find our Community Guidelines in full here.

Loading comments...
Loading comments...