Becoming knowledgeable about different types of sexually transmitted diseases and how they’re contracted is a pivotal element of sex education

A company based in Stamford, Connecticut has decided to combine learning with fun by creating a range of children’s toys inspired by common STDs.

The toys have been released to mark STD Awareness Month in the US and include cuddly creations depicting venereal diseases such as chlamydia, gonorrhea and herpes.

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Giantmicrobes Inc. has created a range of toys inspired by sexually transmitted diseases to raise awareness about sexual health (Giantmicrobes)

Giantmicrobes Inc., the company behind the creative endeavour, was founded in 2002 with the aim of educating children and adults about medical topics.

There are a variety of other products available on the website, including toys depicting chicken pox, antibodies, bed bugs, the common cold and meningitis.

The toys have proven a massive hit, with many people sharing photos of their purchases on social media.

STD Awareness Month is observed every April in the US and is promoted by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

The aim of the month is to raise awareness for the way in which STDs affect countless individuals and to encourage people to become more comfortable discussing sexual health.

In addition to selling cute toys for STD Awareness Month, Giantmicrobes has also created a fact sheet about each of the STDs personified as plushies.

“Guys, are these not the cutest!?!” one consumer wrote on Instagram.

“Unfortunately, they may look cute… but are NOT cute if you contract one of them!”

In October 2016, it was reported that STD infections had reached a record high in the US.

Research discovered that 1.5 million cases of chlamydia had been reported the previous year, in addition to 400,000 cases of gonorrhea and nearly 24,000 cases of primary and secondary syphilis.

The NHS states that many people affected by STIs may not experience symptoms, which is why it’s so important to visit a sexual health clinic for tests if you haven’t already.

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