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10 best kids' desks

Create a comfortable space for children to learn and get creative in by investing in a well-designed, functional study table

Give your child comfort and practicality with our roundup of the best desks on the market ( Little Folks Furniture )

Encourage your child’s creativity and concentration with a dedicated desk that’s the right size and design. Younger kids find focus from having their own place for drawing, painting or reading. A good desk helps older children with a personal zone for study.

With all children’s furniture, natural materials and non-toxic finishes should be considered. Wood is popular for practicality: it’s warm, can be wiped clean, and refinished after years of use.

Other child-friendly design features include rounded edges and handles – important for avoiding scrapes and helping kids to grip.

Brooklyn Child To Teen Desk By Oeuf: £545, nubie.co.uk

With three height settings, this desk makes itself useful for longer. The work surface adjusts between 62-75cm; suiting a child up to a young teen.

It has a good level of finish, made in birch plywood with a white surface. Storage boxes can be moved and added around the edges to hold pens and pencils.

Oeuf specialises in designer kids’ furniture and uses non-toxic finishes.

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In2wood kids’ desk: £222, smallable.com

This kids’ desk comes with a neutral birch plywood top, and legs finished in a range of soft colours. The pen groove and inkwell are a little nod to vintage school desks, while the overall shape is more modern.

The small size suits kids aged 2-6, and the large kids aged 6-10 (£258). The compartment is good for hiding pens and drawings but would be more useful if it closed.

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Max Contemporary Desk By Woood: £195, cuckooland.com

Woood’s designs are manufactured in the Netherlands, where sustainably-sourced timber is used to bring a touch of luxury to the standard flatpack.

This bureau-style pine desk is practical and well-made, with two drawers and shelves for keeping stationery tidy. It’s a mini-version of a grown-up desk, which should give children a sense of importance.

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Compton Desk: £185, next.co.uk

Next’s Compton desk is part of a furniture range, which helps keep a kids’ room look co-ordinated.

The desk itself is fairly basic, with two easy-to-open drawers of different sizes. The storage compartments which make organising fun – the pinboard is a particularly nice addition.

The quality of the veneer finish is a little lacking for the price. It comes in oak effect or white. 

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Ferm Living Little Architect Desk: £219, cloudberryliving.co.uk

A quality finish rarely gets lavished on children’s furniture, but this desk is an exception.

It is beautifully smooth and wipes down with a damp cloth. Rounded edges avoid scrapes and the back bar makes it a stable and comfortable place for a toddler to sit.

The Little Architect range comes in five colours to mix and match and includes a table, chair and bench.

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Star Bright Desk: £122.50, gltc.co.uk

The star-shaped openings on the drawers of this simple desk are practical as well as joyful – they make it easy for little hands to grip and pull.

It’s made in MDF, lacking the robustness of a solid wood piece, and the exposed screwheads look a bit untidy.

The brilliant white finish is attractive, and easy to wipe clean. For 5 years and up.

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Ypperlig Children’s Table: £40, Ikea

A squarer top means you can pull this table out from the wall, and have two children sit either side.

The top is solid beech – up to taking a few scratches and knocks – but the frame is metal, keeping the whole piece lightweight and easy to move.

The rounded edges are child-friendly, and the frame colour makes a change from the usual white. There’s a matching bench (£30).

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Pupitre Child’s Desk And Stool: £159.50, maisonsdumonde.com

This one might remind you of your schooldays, but the jolly taupe colour and star print are far more pleasant.

The combination of desk and stool keeps helps kids from getting distracted, but does mean the piece is easily outgrown.

The metal hook on the side is a practical touch, and the lid lifts to reveal a compartment for books. A piston stops the lid slamming onto little fingers.

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Gaby Solid Pine Child’s Desk: £259, laredoute.co.uk

A sturdy desk in solid pine that comes at a reasonable price. It comes in a white-lacquer finish, but the untreated version gives you far more possibilities for customising yourself.

It has a good amount of storage for a kids’ desk, with one long drawer, and four at the side. It’s more traditional than trendy, but that means it will last well in the long run.

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Fargo Study Desk: £238.50, littlefolksfurniture.co.uk

For those who are serious about their study, this little desk looks like a miniature version of mum or dad’s. There’s an open compartment for tidying away books and drawings, and the footwell protects the wall behind from any footmarks.

It is well-made, with a hardwood frame. There are three colour finishes, which have been tested to British Standards for toxicity.

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The Verdict: Best kids' desks

The Brooklyn desk from Nubie has been designed with longevity in mind – ideal for those looking to get the most for their money.

It adjusts easily as your child grows, and can be re-set for a younger sibling. Oeuf pays special attention to child-friendly materials and finishes too.

IndyBest product reviews are unbiased, independent advice you can trust. On some occasions, we earn revenue if you click the links and buy the products, but we never allow this to bias our coverage. The reviews are compiled through a mix of expert opinion and real-world testing.

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